asian philosphy

asian philosphy.

Project description Please read the following (course description) and write 1 reflection page of any ideas or thoughts you got in your mind Ill attach a sample on how you should write the reflection course description: Asia is home to two of the world’s great philosophical traditions: the Indian and Chinese tradit ions. This course will introduce students to each of these two traditions, by surveying a selection of their key philosophical texts, thinkers, concepts, themes, and schools. We will cover Hindu philosophy in general and the classical Yoga school in parti cular, along with Indian Buddhism, Chinese Buddhism, and Daoism. Amongst the texts and thinkers studied in this course will include: the Yoga Sutras of Patañjali, Nagarjuna’s Mulamadhyamakakarika ( Versus on the Middle ), and Lao Tzu’s Dao De Jing . Our stu dy of Indian philosophy will commence with a brief introduction to each of the six orthodox darsanas (perspectives or schools) of Hindu philosophy, in the context of which special attention will be paid to the classical Yoga school of Patañjali. We will p robe important strands of influence, and points of contrast, between the Yoga school and other Indian philosophical traditions, such as those of the Sankhya school and of Jainism. Philosophical issues to be considered will include: What are persons and wha t is their relationship to nature? Is it ever morally permissible to harm other living beings (e.g., plants and animals)? Is it possible to avoid inducing such harm through extraordinary feats of mental and physical self – discipline? How do our past expe riences affect our present patterns of thought and action? What is suffering and how does it relate to action and to morality? Is moral authenticity possible through the meditative discipline of the mind? 2 Turning then to our unit on Indian Buddhism, w e will first introduce the doctrinal foundations of Buddhist philosophy including the four noble truths, the eight – fold path, and the three marks of existence ( tri – laksana ). Special attention will be paid, moreover, both to the Buddhist analysis of suffer ing ( duhkha ), as well as to the core Buddhist doctrine of anatman (no – abiding – self). Following this, we will consider Nagarjuna’s powerful criticisms of mainstream Buddhist philosophy in the Mulamadhyamakakarika, and explore the related debate between Mahayana (or ˜Great Vehicle’) and Hinayana (or ˜Little Vehicle ‘) Buddhism regarding the nature and ultimate reality of Samsara (cycle of rebirths), Karma (action; fruits of action), and Nirvana (liberation). In the final third of the course, we will then turn our attention to Chinese philosophy and in particular to the schools of Humanism, Daoism, and Buddhism. As we shall see, though some of these schools are influenced markedly by the others, and in spite of the fact that all resonate with important themes of Indian thinking as well, Chinese philosophy is neverthe less characterized by several lively and interrelated debates surrounding issues in political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. Amongst these controversies are included questions such as: What is the nature of good government? What qualit ies make for an ethical individual or statesman, and how might one cultivate them? What sorts of relationships should one cultivate with their family, society, and environment? Are individuals themselves constituted by such relationships, or conceivable i ndependently of them? Should political ideology and moral character be cultivated, or should we instead abandon the artificiality of human convention in favour of a return to nature? What is nature, and what is its relationship to human nature and human b eings? Do human and other beings have real essences and/or autonomy? Or are essence and autonomy merely intellectual fabrications which ultimately only obscure reality and produce suffering? Can enlightenment mitigate such suffering, and if so, how can w e attain it?

asian philosphy

Posted in Uncategorized