collection for a book 1

collection for a book 1.

There are seven opportunities to turn in Collections. Everyone must turn in the first one, on The Epic of Gilgamesh. Then, you must choose three more across the semester, from Collections 2-7, and turn them in by the due date, for a total of four Collections across the semester. You will not be able to submit after the due date, so make sure to follow up with the texts you’ve liked working with the most and find most interesting as you move through the course. Don’t get caught at the end of the semester with less than four Collections because you’ll get zeros for missing ones! The Collection is the summation of your experience of the text, including reading alone (notes) and class activities and discussions, and your own creative responses. I’d also like to note that you have three “late days” (total) for the Collection assignment. Just email me ahead of time and let me know you’re taking a “late” and you’ll automatically get the extension.

For Collections: The Collection is a place to bring together your experience of the text in our class. It includes the following pieces:

1)A unique and interesting title that reflects your take on the work (check your keywords from your notes!) and invites us to read your work.

2) Four items, either from your daily notes or class notes or our discussions that best reflect your interests regarding the text at hand. At least two items must be from your Daily Notes. Include them, and include a bit of further reflection on them or introduction to them, considering where you are now relative to when you were reading alone. If you choose a class discussion, be sure to both describe it and elaborate your own thoughts on it. Make sure to take notes in class, or even sketch or draw in class (totally welcome) as these notes may be useful here. You may include one item or include extra items from previous texts if you wish–particularly if you’ve skipped a post for a text and now feel that such items have relevance to your discussion of the current text. Don’t forget you may do creative portions of this! You need to demonstrate your class prep, notes, and class engagement. So, for example, for prep notes, include thoughtful and thorough notes, and discuss them further or respond to them. If your item is a class activity or discussion, include it and respond to it. An item could also be a further discussion of a notes question and/or a creative response to it or a class discussion. You may also include reflections on The Daodejing. You bring the items that bring your Collection to life.

3)A paragraph or so that describes the thought of the author: Be very clear about the main concepts you take away. Not a summary, but a distillation of the big ideas conveyed. Be thorough here–this is where you demonstrate your analysis. Creative responses welcome in this section.

4) A paragraph or so that describes how YOU think about what the authors are saying, doing. This personal response should go in depth regarding your own thought about the issues at hand. You may agree, disagree, elaborate, provide examples, extend, etc. Creative responses welcome in this section. Make sure your reflections are distinct from the discussion of the author’s ideas.

You may draw, provide relevant links, write a poem, include a photo (of your own), whatever you like to create your mini-book of your reading of the text. Just be very sure to include all the pieces.

I will be looking for the following in your posts: Thoughtful notes preparation and in-class participation (listening counts–I’ll notice that you noticed), thorough analysis and reflection with good delineation of ideas within the text and thoughtful response. I’ll also be looking for your intellectual creativity: surprise us with the ideas you bring to the post. I expect everyone to have their own readings of the texts.

collection for a book 1