create a portfolio

Follow the format below while creating your portfolio. You should write in a professional manner except in the reflective piece of the portfolio. Otherwise, all items should be parsed as if they were going to be reviewed by an executive at a financial institution.

  • Introduction: In 1-2 pages, describe what your original strategy was in choosing your stocks and the strengths that you saw when you did so. Also highlight any areas you avoided. Please keep in mind that you will be evaluating these decisions and their merits in the reflective section.
  • Stock portfolio: Create a professional presentation of all of the information you have gathered on your stocks throughout the term. Please keep in mind this is a professional presentation; therefore, matching fonts, styles, and readability will be considered in your grade.
  • Prospectus: In 2-3 pages, suggest what should be done with your stock portfolio going forward. Cite examples from the data you collected while making your suggestions. Please consider which stock you believe will perform in the future and which you believe should be sold. Make sure to consider how long a position you would recommend holding for various stocks.
  • Reflections: In one 2-3 page essay, speaking as a student and not as a hypothetical professional, answer the following questions.
    • Were you surprised by how your portfolio performed?
    • What factors impacted your initial stock selection, and how would the knowledge you have gained in this course have affected the selection if you had it to do all over again?
    • How did your perception of the state of the current economy affect your stock selection, and how would it have differed if the market were trending in the inverse direction?
    • What market indicators did you find to be the most informative and why?
    • Do you believe that deep research or intuition is a more important asset for an investor?

Stock’s reported on in portfolio

Apple

Facebook

Amazon

Netflix’s

TOPIC’S DISCUSSED DURING THE COURSE.

1. Intrinsic value

2. A call whose strike price exceeds the price of the stock (out-of-the-money call). A call whose strike price approximates the price of the stock (at-the-money call). A call whose strike price is less than the price of the stock (in-the-money call).

3. Moving averages. Can you time buying or selling of stocks based on technical analysis?

4. Price-to-earnings ratio, price-to-sales ratio, price-to-book ratio, the PEG ratio, dividends, estimated growth rate, profit margin, and return on equity.

5. Standard Deviation and beta