HRES2301 Employment Law

HRES2301 Employment Law

A. Issues on HRES2301 Employment Law

The issues addressed in this HRES2301 Employment Law Appeal are:
1. Was a business, undertaking or other activity carried on by or through 2 or more employers or other persons, or a combination of them?
2. Was the Claimant entitled to the payment of wages and vacation pay, in the amounts detailed in the Order?
3. Was the Claimant’s employment terminated for cause, thereby relieving the Appellant from the requirement to provide the Claimant with notice of termination or payment in lieu of notice?

B. Analysis of HRES2301 Employment Law

1. Was a business, undertaking or other activity carried on by or through 2 or more employers or other persons, or a combination of them?

Almost all businesses use some sort of employment law.

Employment law is the area of law that governs the employer-employee relationship.

Therefore, if the business has more than one employee, then the business likely uses employment law.

This area is made up of both state and federal laws and includes many different subjects with the common goal to protect workers’ rights.

For employees, these laws work to:

Prevent discrimination

Promote health and safety

Establish a minimum required level for economic support

Prevent work disruption due to disputes between labor and management

Just one well-known example is Title VII. This is a federal statute included as a part of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This famous law prohibits employment discrimination based on a person’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

This means that these aspects can’t legally be considered when hiring, firing, promoting, compensating, or in any other aspect of employment.

Another well-known example is the Fair Labor Standards Act or FLSA. This crucial piece of federal legislation was enacted during the Great Depression when workers often suffered long hours, harsh conditions, and unjust pay.

The FLSA established a federal minimum hourly wage and child labor laws for certain industries. When the FLSA was enacted in 1938, the minimum hourly wage was only $0.25. In 2013, it’s $7.25.