Social Media and Genetics

Social Media and Genetics

Social Media and Genetics.

From the e-Activity, discuss how current or potential employers might be able to use the information you found and possible steps that could be taken to help ensure your privacy.

Provide specific examples to support your response.

Analyze the issues involved in the privacy of genetic information and anticipate what additional issues will most likely arise in the next 10 to 20 years, as well as how those issues should be addressed.

The data analyzed revealed one- to two-thirds of variance in social media use is attributable to additive genetic traits; unique and shared environmental factors account for the remainder of variance. York also provides an analytical blueprint for using DF regression in future investigations of genetic influence on communication behaviors and media effects.

Past behavior genetics research using twin study survey data has shown genetic influence on a wide range of communication behaviors. This is the first study to show that genetic traits also affect social media use.

The assumption here is that known genetic variation between fraternal and identical twins can be leveraged to study how genetic variation influences patterns of observable behavior. We are still working in a ‘black box’ in that we can’t directly observe how genes impact our neuro-anatomy, which in turn impacts cognitive processing, personality, and subsequent media selection and effects. However, this study — and this line of inquiry — is a starting point for studying genetic influence on communication