The meaning of protest

The meaning of protest.

The meaning of protest

Title: This essay should have a title centered above the first paragraph. You may use “The Meaning of Protest” or another title of your choosing. Central Question: What is the meaning of protest? Why is this an essential right for all Americans, and even all humans? What constitutes appropriate and necessary protest? Development: In engaging with this question, construct a thesis viewpoint that responds directly to the central question of this essay, and introduces two main examples of protest from this unit of the class (i.e. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Wael Ghonim, Gigi Ibriham, Colin Kaepernick). For example, you can discuss Martin Luther King Jr. and Gigi Ibriham, Malcolm X and Colin Kaepernick, etc. Any combination of two examples is fine, as long as you have given thought to how your two examples illustrate your thesis viewpoint. In the final section of your essay you will be asked to explore similarities and differences among your selected leaders. Research: Outside research is not required for this assignment. If you would like to use an outside source, that is fine, just include both an in-text citation at the point of reference, and also include the source in your Works Cited Page at the end of the essay. In-Text Citation: This essay must include at least two in-text citations of classroom materials (i.e. texts or videos we have used). Make sure to cite all texts/videos using MLA format. Works Cited: This essay should include an MLA formatted Works Cited at the end of the paper. Consult the Purdue Owl online website for guidance on how to prepare a Works Cited Page. Structure: In this essay, you are required to include four sections, however the length of each section is your choice. So, for example, Section #1 can be one paragraph or two. It’s up to you.

As long as each of the four sections is included, and the entire essay reaches the 800 word minimum, you are good. Section #1: Introduction Your introduction should be focused around three features: Hook—begin with a hook to interest your reader. Utilize at least one of the five styles described in this unit’s “5 Approaches to Writing an Excellent Hook” document. Necessary Background—provide necessary factual context about the topic before presenting your thesis. This section should be objective and balanced. Bring your reader “up to speed” on key information. Thesis—Construct a thesis that responds directly to the central question being asked. Offer a main viewpoint on the central question, and preview the two individuals examples that will be developed in your ensuing paragraphs. E.G. “These ideas about protest can be seen in the examples of _________ and _________” (your two people) Section #2: Main Ideas In this section, develop the two main examples previewed in your thesis. Don’t merely summarize their lives but bring the discussion back to your core theme: what is the meaning of protest? Why is this an essential right? When is protest appropriate and necessary? For each paragraph, begin with a strong Topic Sentence that introduces the main idea of that paragraph. When you have a new main idea focus, begin a new paragraph. Section #3: Engaging with Opposition The goal of this paragraph is to build unity with your opposition, while strengthening ideas in your thesis. For this section, you will need to identify one counterargument idea to engage with. In other words, you must identify one idea that disagrees with your thesis point of view about protest. This, for example, could be the idea that violence is a legitimate act during protest if first provoked. Or, conversely, that violence is never the right course of action during a protest. Any opposing view to your own will work. In this section, utilize the three steps of counterargument we have learned this semester. In the context of this theme (The Meaning of Protest), your counterargument might be, for example, someone who disagreed with the protest you have described, someone who believes violent protest is acceptable under certain circumstances, someone who thinks it is right/wrong to protest during the national anthem, etc. Utilize this module’s Three Steps of Counterargument a) Acknowledge the views of your opposition. Use direct quotation, paraphrase or summarize their perspective in a way that is fair and accurate. b) Identify a point (s) of agreement with your opposition. Build a “bridge” uniting your perspectives. This common ground can be agreement on a specific idea, or simply unity based on shared values. c) Clarify your overall disagreement with the opposition. Address their concerns directly. Re-frame and strengthen your thesis.

The meaning of protest