The Three Languages of Politics

Read Arnold Kling, The Three Languages of Politics: Talking Across the Political Divides. The link to the book is on the Blackboard Home Page. Kling suggests that humans use language to divide into groups – i.e., we use words to conform to a group we identify with and to attack the beliefs of other groups. Write an essay which includes the following: 1) Explain what “political divides” Kling discusses – what divisions does he identify? • Do not simply quote Kling’s words. You may use some of his words, but mostly use your own words to show you understand Kling’s argument. The more you use your own words, and not just Kling’s, the better your paper will be. • In chapter 2, Kling provides eight examples to support his description of political divisions. Explain three of those examples. Do not just quickly list three examples, but explain how each group Kling identifies addresses the examples you choose. Do not simply choose the first three Kling discusses. 2) Discuss why we use language to divide ourselves politically. The why is key. • Kling’s analysis of why we use language to divide ourselves relates to how humans seek status and prestige within their own group. So, pay attention when Kling discusses status, prestige, and self-regard. • Consider how the quest for status can include accusing, denouncing, and asserting moral superiority over others. • Note: Sometimes Kling calls groups “coalitions,” “tribes,” or “tribal coalitions.” 3) Reflect upon the book more generally by addressing the following questions: • Why do you think Kling wrote the book? Why does he want to make readers aware of the three languages of politics? • What do you think Kling wants readers to understand about themselves? • Is Kling correct that there are three languages of politics? Might there be more or fewer? 4) Explain what Kling means when he says that, according to some, “certain groups or classes of people intrinsically fall into categories of oppressor and oppressed.” • Do not immediately assume you understand Kling’s point here. Spend some time reading the chapter with the quoted statement. • Accurately, and insightfully, explaining what Kling means with here will capture the professor’s attention 5) Consider whether you are a political “tribalist” in Kling’s sense. That is, when you discuss politics, do you use words that accuse and name call – presenting someone you disagree with as a bad person – more so than being genuinely open to the ideas of those you disagree with? Include a final paragraph reflecting on how Kling’s analysis might apply to your own approach to politi History 10 Semester Project Due Wednesday, December 4 Make Sure Student Name is on Each Page of Project 5-6 Pages, Double Spaced, 12 pt. font. Read Arnold Kling, The Three Languages of Politics: Talking Across the Political Divides. The link to the book is on the Blackboard Home Page. Kling suggests that humans use language to divide into groups – i.e., we use words to conform to a group we identify with and to attack the beliefs of other groups. Write an essay which includes the following: 1) Explain what “political divides” Kling discusses – what divisions does he identify? • Do not simply quote Kling’s words. You may use some of his words, but mostly use your own words to show you understand Kling’s argument. The more you use your own words, and not just Kling’s, the better your paper will be. • In chapter 2, Kling provides eight examples to support his description of political divisions. Explain three of those examples. Do not just quickly list three examples, but explain how each group Kling identifies addresses the examples you choose. Do not simply choose the first three Kling discusses. 2) Discuss why we use language to divide ourselves politically. The why is key. • Kling’s analysis of why we use language to divide ourselves relates to how humans seek status and prestige within their own group. So, pay attention when Kling discusses status, prestige, and self-regard. • Consider how the quest for status can include accusing, denouncing, and asserting moral superiority over others. • Note: Sometimes Kling calls groups “coalitions,” “tribes,” or “tribal coalitions.” 3) Reflect upon the book more generally by addressing the following questions: • Why do you think Kling wrote the book? Why does he want to make readers aware of the three languages of politics? • What do you think Kling wants readers to understand about themselves? • Is Kling correct that there are three languages of politics? Might there be more or fewer? 4) Explain what Kling means when he says that, according to some, “certain groups or classes of people intrinsically fall into categories of oppressor and oppressed.” • Do not immediately assume you understand Kling’s point here. Spend some time reading the chapter with the quoted statement. • Accurately, and insightfully, explaining what Kling means with here will capture the professor’s attention 5) Consider whether you are a political “tribalist” in Kling’s sense. That is, when you discuss politics, do you use words that accuse and name call – presenting someone you disagree with as a bad person – more so than being genuinely open to the ideas of those you disagree with? Include a final paragraph reflecting on how Kling’s analysis might apply to your own approach to politi