they say i say 2

ONE

Identify ONE idea from EACH of the following that demonstrates your thoughts and/or what you’ve learned, appreciated, or have questions about.

    1. They Say/I Say, Chapter 8
    2. They Say/I Say, Chapter 9
    3. “Essential Skills for Academic Papers,” pages 41-52
    • Fully explain each idea so someone who hasn’t read or hasn’t seen what you have will understand your insight or question.
    • Reference the source you’re referring to in your responses.
    • Properly format titles, as you’ll see above (so that all keywords are capitalized; the titles of long works are italicized; the titles of short works are placed in “quotation marks”).

TWO

  • In a sentence or two, explain what Nigerian novelist and essayist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie means by a “single story.” (definition, analysis)
    • Be sure to refer to the author’s profession, the author’s name, and the properly formatted title of her work. (It is a short video, so the title placed in quotation marks. All keywords are capitalized.)
    • Here, you’re sharing Adichie’s ideas, so use a voice marker (signal phrase) to demonstrate that you are referencing her ideas (not your own).
    • Use MLA in-text citations to identify the timestamp location or transcript page of the related passage(s).
      • (Adichie 00:05:42).
      • (Adichie 85).
  • In a sentence or two, explain the problem with stereotypes, according to Adichie. (analysis)
    • Again, you’re referring to Adichie’s ideas, so use a voice marker (signal phrase) to demonstrate that you’re referencing her deas (not your own).
    • Use an MLA in-text citation to identify the timestamp location or transcript page of the related passage(s).
  • In three or more sentences –
    • Share an example of a “single story” you’re familiar with. (synthesis)
    • Explain what makes this a good example of a single story. What is untrue about it? (analysis/synthesis)
    • Explain how we could rethink this single story so it is more complete. (analysis/synthesis)
      • When writing for an academic audience, edit out any instances of “you,” “your,” “you’re.” Use the third person (e.g., readers, professionals) or second person plural (ie: we), instead.

THREE

    1. Explain in one-three sentences what media theorist and educator Neil Postman means when he uses the terms “word weavers” and “world makers.” (analysis)
    2. Interpret and explain in one-three sentences how these terms relate to your work as an academic writer. (synthesis)
    • Refer to the author’s profession, the author’s name, and the properly formatted title of his work in your response. (It’s a chapter in a book, so the title placed in quotation marks. All keywords are capitalized.)
    • Use MLA in-text citations so your reader can find the passages you’re referring to easily.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs241zeg&feature=youtu.be