wk 3 d1 respond to two classmates 100 words each response

Guided Response: Respond to two of your classmates’ posts. Each response should be at least 100 words.Be sure to relate your discussion back to the course materials and move the conversation forward by asking a question, raising a new point, or elaborating more thoroughly upon a point already raised.

Original Post:

Prior to beginning work on this discussion,

  • Read Chapters 7, 8, and 9 of the course textbook.
  • Look over the Week 3 Primary Source List and select a primary source which applies to your chosen group, and your chosen option for this discussion.
  • Complete the “Analyzing Primary Sources” activity in Chapter 8, Section 1 of your course textbook to help you think about and understand your primary source.

*Note: Remember that a primary source is an artifact or document created at the time of an event or by someone who personally witnessed the event. Please review the handouts, Types of Sources and Primary Sources.

Choose one of the three options below to address in this discussion. Your initial post should be at least 250 words in length. Your post should make reference to the required materials with in-text citations. Your references and citations must be formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center (Links to an external site.)’s APA Style (Links to an external site.) resource. For help with this, see the Ashford Writing Center’s Citing Within Your Paper (Links to an external site.) resource. You may use additional scholarly sources to support your points if you choose.

Consult the Writing a Discussion Board Post (Links to an external site.) and the Summary vs. Analysis (Links to an external site.) resources as you formulate your response.

For help with your initial post review the Thinking about Week 3 Discussion guide.

Option 1: The Roaring 20s

Find a primary source from the 1920s that is related to the group you chose for your Final Project and that you can use in your Final Project. You may use one of the sources listed in the Primary Sources for Week 3 handout, or you may find your own. Complete the “Analyzing Primary Sources” activity in Chapter 8, Section 8 of your course text to help you think about and understand your primary source.

Write an initial post which addresses the following prompts:

  • Write a brief overview of the changes that occurred during the 1920s.
  • What primary source did you choose and what event does it focus on?
  • Why was this event important, and how does it fit into the conflicts and changes of the 1920s?
  • What does your primary source tell you about the event? And what does it not tell you?
  • How does the event you chose relate to your Final Project topic?
  • Provide an APA citation for your primary source. If needed, review the APA References Guide (Links to an external site.) PDF for some examples of APA citations.

Option 2: The Great Depression

Find a primary source from the Great Depression that is related to the group you chose for your Final Project and that you can use in your Final Project. You may use one of the sources listed in the Primary Sources for Week 3 handout, or you may find your own. Complete the “Analyzing Primary Sources” activity in Chapter 8, Section 1 of your course text to help you think about and understand your primary source.

Write an initial post which addresses the following prompts:

  • Write a brief overview of the changes that occurred during the Great Depression.
  • What primary source did you choose and what event does it focus on?
  • What does this source tell you about how your chosen group was impacted by the Great Depression?
  • What does your primary source tell you? And what does it not tell you?
  • How does this source and the history it describes relate to your Final Project topic?
  • Provide an APA citation for your primary source. If needed, review the APA References Guide (Links to an external site.) PDF for some examples of APA citations.

Option 3: World War Two

Find a primary source from World War Two that is related to the group you chose for your Final Project and that you can use in your Final Project. You may use one of the sources listed in the Primary Sources for Week 3 handout, or you may find your own. Complete the “Analyzing Primary Sources” activity in Chapter 8, Section 1 of your course text to help you think about and understand your primary source.

Write an initial post which addresses the following prompts:

  • Write a brief overview of the changes that occurred during World War Two.
  • What primary source did you choose and what event does it focus on?
  • What does this source tell you about how your chosen group experienced World War Two?
  • What does your primary source tell you? And what does it not tell you?
  • How does this source and the history it describes relate to your Final Project topic?
  • Provide an APA citation for your primary source. If needed, review the APA References Guide (Links to an external site.) PDF for some examples of APA citations.

Classmate #1 Sara Eddy

Week 3 Discussion 1

The Great Depression happened all throughout the 1930’s and ended in 1940 at the start of World War II ( Barnes & Bowles, 2014). When Roosevelt, the Democratic nominee in 1932, became president, he got to work on several programs to help Americans during The Great Depression. He was known as the president who was both most loved and most hated. His programs helped America gradually and consistently over time but didn’t do much to bring immediate aid to the American people (Barnes & Bowles, 2014).

I chose “Please Help Us Mr. President”. It focuses on the Great Depression and although my chosen people are Native Americans, these letters are a cry from a group of people looked down upon racially and culturally as the Native Americans were too. Segregation was very much taking place based on skin color and ethnicity at this time. Reading these letters, one can tell that African American people had respect for the overall changes the president was striving to make but their immediate needs were not being met. Officials meant to help people locally were taking advantage of the provisions from the government for themselves or giving them to white people (Black Americans Write to FDR, 1934-1936). An excerpt from Black Americans Write to FDR (1934-1936) reads, “I am sorry to worrie you with this Mr. President but hard as it is to believe the releaf officials here are using up most every thing that you send for them self + their friends”.

One program that assisted Native Americans impacted by the recession was the Civil Works Administration under the Federal Relief Emergency Relief Administration (Barnes & Bowles, 2014). Thousands of Native Americans were put to work repairing reservation housing, excavating prehistoric Native American mounds for the Smithsonian, and make Alaskan rivers easier navigate to promote salmon breeding (Barnes & Bowles, 2014).

Barnes, L. & Bowles, M. (2014). The American story: Perspectives and encounters from 1877 [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/

(1934-1936). “Please Help Us Mr. President”: Black Americans Write to FDR. Retrieved from
http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/137

Classmate #2 Jonathan McKenzie

Write a brief overview of the changes that occurred during the 1920s.

During the early 1920s, this was a significant period for African Americans who served in the military. All the experience and training they received sparked a movement that was called the New Negro. “In the 1920s, many African Americans expressed outspoken advocacy of their rights and dignity and a refusal to submit to segre­gation or second-class citizenship” (Barnes & Bowles, 2014). Those that participated were in pursuit of a new vision of economic and social change. They felt they were entitled to it since they traveled all over the world to fighting to maintain democracy for all.

Another significant event was the Tulsa, Oklahoma race riot of 1921. The city’s prosperous oil industry attracted out of town wealthy and business-minded African Americans. As migration took place, things were peaceful at first until a white female made an allegation that an African American attacked her. Black men organized and came together to help stop the lynching of the accused man. “Police arrested Dick Rowland, and a White mob gathered outside the jail demanding the man be released to them” (Barnes & Bowles, 2014). Among the black men were war vets who were armed and determined to go against anyone who terrorized their freedoms. Once people started getting heated and shots were fired, the riot initiated. African Americans took the bulk of the damage with destroyed homes and businesses, along with approximately 30 killed during the riot. In the end, none of the white rioters were charged due to a grand jury deciding that intimidating armed African Americans with guns was the reason why the riot started in the first place.

What primary source did you choose and what event does it focus on?

I choose the “The New Negro”: “When he’s hit, he hits back!”. This source highlights the significant events that took place after World War I that shaped the lives of African Americans. It identified their migration from the south to the northern states, federal law against lynching, organizations and key personnel who aided in supporting the “New Negro” movement.

Why was this event important, and how does it fit into the conflicts and changes of the 1920s?

Lynching back in the early 1920s was still legal and affected the African American communities primarily. “Lynching was a tool used to hide the reality that mob violence against African Americans was closely related to shifting economic and social structures of the New South” (Barnes & Bowles, 2014). African Americans lived in fear, knowing that a simple allegation of a crime, whether guilty or not, was all it took to be hanged back then. Congressman Leonidas C. Dyer presented an anti-lynching bill that was written by the founder of the NAACP back in 1918 (Hart, 1921). Once this bill was approved, it would mean that anyone who contributed to the act of lynching in any way would be fined and sentenced to prison. In 1922 the bill got defeated by southern Democrats in the Senate.

What does your primary source tell you about the event? And what does it not tell you?

This source tells me that the opposition against black people during that time was massive and prevailing. Knowing that and still having the courage to use their platforms to present anti-lynching laws at the highest level, is commendable. What I’m not seeing is the accurate identification of how many times the bill was introduced after it was defeated in 1922.

How does the event you chose relate to your Final Project topic?

This event is tied to my final project in two ways. It directly involves African Americans, and its an event that took place before 1945 that damaged them physically and mentally.

Barnes, L. & Bowles, M. (2014). The American story: Perspectives and encounters from 1877 [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/ (Links to an external site.)

Hartt, R. L. (1921, Jan. 15). “The new Negro”: “When he’s hit, he hits back!”. Independent, 76, 59-60. Retrieved from http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5127